Backup Office 365…It’s in the Cloud. It’s ALREADY backed up…..isn’t it?

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Over the last few years, I’ve seen a significant increase in the number of  businesses moving from on-premises Exchange environments to Office 365. That move makes absolute sense. When it comes to messaging, there’s hardly any difference (in terms of business value and competitiveness) whether you run it yourself or consume it a service.

But one area in particular does make a difference: backup and restore. Continue reading → Backup Office 365…It’s in the Cloud. It’s ALREADY backed up…..isn’t it?

Hybrid Configuration Wizard Transfers Settings – Sorry bit late now

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Microsoft’s announcement that the Exchange Hybrid Configuration Wizard (HCW) is now able to transfer some configuration settings from an Exchange on-premises organization to Exchange Online came as a disappointment. Not because of the functionality, which is welcome, but because it is limited and far too late. Continue reading → Hybrid Configuration Wizard Transfers Settings – Sorry bit late now

Data Resiliency in Microsoft Office 365

Given the complex nature of cloud computing, Microsoft is mindful that it’s not a case of if things will go wrong, but rather when. Microsoft designed their cloud services to maximize reliability and minimize the negative effects on customers when things do go wrong. We have moved beyond the traditional strategy of relying on complex physical infrastructure, and Microsoft have built redundancy directly into the cloud services. They use a combination of less complex physical infrastructure and more intelligent
software that builds data resiliency into our services and delivers high availability to the customers.
This post describes data resiliency in Microsoft Office 365 from two perspectives:
1. How Microsoft prevents customer data from becoming lost or corrupt in Exchange Online,
SharePoint Online, and Skype for Business; and
2. How Exchange Online, SharePoint Online, and Skype for Business protect customer data
against malware and ransomware. Continue reading → Data Resiliency in Microsoft Office 365

Demystifying Hybrid Free/Busy: what are the moving parts?

Hybrid Free/Busy is one of those things that many people do not fully understand. If everything works well, the complexity is hidden from view and people working in various parts of organization can seamlessly work together. But if things go wrong… you will appreciate deeper understanding of what makes it work. This is why we wanted to create the blog post series on the subject.

In this article, we will discuss how Free/Busy works in an Exchange Hybrid configuration. In next blog post, you will learn what are the most common problems along with how we go about diagnosing those (often) complex issues.

So, what is Free/Busy? Free/Busy is a feature that allows you to see when others are free (their calendar shows availability), busy (their calendar shows them as busy), or even Out of Office, or Something Else (tentative or working away) so that you can find an appropriate time for your meetings. Calling it all “Free/Busy/OOF/Something-Else” didn’t sound so cool to marketing hence “Free/Busy”. In a Hybrid deployment, we usually have some mailboxes in Exchange On-Premises and some mailboxes in Exchange Online (users are in different premises) and this has to work there too. Continue reading → Demystifying Hybrid Free/Busy: what are the moving parts?

iOS 11 and Exchange 2016/Online: Not Loving the Love

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An Easy Upgrade to iOS 11

The excitement barely stopped as I upgraded my iPhone 7s Plus to iOS 11 soon after Apple released the upgrade on September 19. The good news is that the upgrade was fast and seamless, which I expected because the phone is recent and I do not use any old 32-bit apps. All my apps worked after the upgrade, including those that I use with Office 365 such as Outlook for iOS (including support for multi-factor authentication), Outlook Groups, Yammer, Teams, Office 365 Admin (Figure 1), and so on. Continue reading → iOS 11 and Exchange 2016/Online: Not Loving the Love

Ways to Migrate Multiple Email Accounts to Office 365

Your organization can migrate email to Office 365 from other systems. Your administrators can migrate mailboxes from an Exchange Server or migrate email from another email system. And your users can import their own email, contacts, and other mailbox information to an Office 365 mailbox created for them. Your organization also can work with a partner to migrate email.

Before you start an email migration, review limits and best practices for Exchange Online to make sure you get the performance and behavior you expect after migration.

Migrate mailboxes from Exchange Server

For migrations from an existing on-premises Exchange Server environment, an administrator can migrate all email, calendar, and contacts from user mailboxes to Office 365.

An administrator performs a staged or cutover migration to Office 365. All email, contacts, and calendar information can be migrated for each mailbox.

There are three types of email migrations that can be made from an Exchange Server: Continue reading → Ways to Migrate Multiple Email Accounts to Office 365

Exchange Server 2010 to 2013 Migration – Reviewing Offline Address Book Configuration

exchange-logo-isolatedOffline Address Books and their existence when running different versions of Exchange comes up alot. So wanted to post up this great article  that covers off what you need to know.

Before installing your first Exchange 2013 server during a migration project you must first review your offline address book configuration.

The issue, as explained in detail by Exchange MVP Andrew Higginbotham here, and mentioned by Microsoft in the release notes and a subsequent blog post, is that Exchange Server 2013 will create a new default offline address book for the organization.

Any mailbox users who do not have an existing OAB assigned to their mailbox directly, or to the mailbox database that they are located on, will download the entire OAB from the new default OAB that Exchange 2013 creates. In organizations with a large OAB or distributed network environment this is obviously not ideal.
Continue reading → Exchange Server 2010 to 2013 Migration – Reviewing Offline Address Book Configuration