Five more reasons why you should download the Azure mobile app

You may have already heard about the Azure mobile app at the Build conference back in May 2017. The app lets you stay connected with Azure even when you are on the go.
Over the last few months, Microsoft have been working closely with customers to improve the Azure mobile app. Below are five more reasons why the Azure app is a must-have.

1. Monitoring resources

The Azure mobile app allows you to quickly check your resources status at a glance. Drill in, and see more details like metrics, Activity Log, properties and execute actions.

1 Resource list

2. Executing scripts to respond to issues

Need to urgently execute your get-out-of-trouble script? You can use Bash and now even PowerShell on Cloud Shell to take full control of your Azure resources. All of your scripts are stored on CloudDrive to use across the app and the portal.

2 Bash  2.1 PowerShell

3. Organizing resources and resource group

Have a lot of resources? No problem, you can favorite your most important resources across subscriptions and keep them in your Favorites tab for easy access.

3.2 Favorites tab

Start creating your Favorites list now – you can do it from the resource view or directly from the resources list tab as shown below.

3 Favorite on resource

3.1 Favorite on list

4. Resource sharing

Tired of sending screenshots to your coworkers to help them find a resource? Now you can share a direct link to the resource via email, text message or other apps with the click of a button.
4 Share

5. Tracking Azure Health incidents

The Azure mobile app can even help you track Azure Health incidents. Just scan the QR code from the portal and track the incident from your phone.
5 QR code portal

 

5.1 Health Event

Microsoft Cloud Services Useful Links

Microsoft Cloud

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Microsoft Azure

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Azure Tools

Azure Docs/Guides/Articles

Microsoft Office 365

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Capacity Planning

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iOS 11 and Exchange 2016/Online: Not Loving the Love

Screen Shot 2017-09-22 at 10.48.04

An Easy Upgrade to iOS 11

The excitement barely stopped as I upgraded my iPhone 7s Plus to iOS 11 soon after Apple released the upgrade on September 19. The good news is that the upgrade was fast and seamless, which I expected because the phone is recent and I do not use any old 32-bit apps. All my apps worked after the upgrade, including those that I use with Office 365 such as Outlook for iOS (including support for multi-factor authentication), Outlook Groups, Yammer, Teams, Office 365 Admin (Figure 1), and so on. Continue reading → iOS 11 and Exchange 2016/Online: Not Loving the Love

Active Directory Access Control List – Attacks and Defense

Recently there has been a lot of attention and a few different blog posts (references at the end of the post) regarding the use of Discretionary Access Control List (DACL) for privilege escalation in a Domain environment. This potential attack vector involves the creation of an escalation path based in AD object permissions (DACLs). For example, gaining “Reset Password” permissions on a privileged account is one possible way to compromise it by DACL’s path.

Although DACL permissions are not the easiest topic to cover in one post and should be digested slowly, there are examples of potential attack scenarios we want to share. The following blog tries to shed some light on the subject, present the possible escalation paths and suggest relevant mitigations.

Continue reading → Active Directory Access Control List – Attacks and Defense

Expand your collaboration with guest access in Microsoft Teams

Since Microsoft Teams became generally available six months ago, more than 125,000 organizations have discovered how teamwork comes to life in Teams. Today, Teams is getting even better with the rollout of guest access to all Office 365 commercial and education customers. Now Office 365 users can add people from outside their company to a team, so guests can participate in chats, join meetings, collaborate on documents, and more.

Guest access has been one of the top requested features for Teams among Office365 customers, and Micrsosoft have been working hard to get it right. They have designed guest access in Teams with three principles at the forefront: Continue reading → Expand your collaboration with guest access in Microsoft Teams

Understanding Office 365 identity and Azure Active Directory

Office 365 uses the cloud-based user authentication service Azure Active Directory to manage users. You can choose from three main identity models in Office 365 when you set up and manage user accounts:

Cloud identity. Manage your user accounts in Office 365 only. No on-premises servers are required to manage users; it’s all done in the cloud.

Synchronized identity. Synchronize on-premises directory objects with Office 365 and manage your users on-premises. You can also synchronize passwords so that the users have the same password on-premises and in the cloud, but they will have to sign in again to use Office 365.

Federated identity. Synchronize on-premises directory objects with Office 365 and manage your users on-premises. The users have the same password on-premises and in the cloud, and they do not have to sign in again to use Office 365. This is often referred to as single sign-on.

It’s important to carefully consider which identity model to use to get up and running. Think about time, existing complexity, and cost. These factors are different for every organization; this topic reviews these key concepts for every identity model to help you choose the identity you want to use for your deployment.

Continue reading → Understanding Office 365 identity and Azure Active Directory

Ways to Migrate Multiple Email Accounts to Office 365

Your organization can migrate email to Office 365 from other systems. Your administrators can migrate mailboxes from an Exchange Server or migrate email from another email system. And your users can import their own email, contacts, and other mailbox information to an Office 365 mailbox created for them. Your organization also can work with a partner to migrate email.

Before you start an email migration, review limits and best practices for Exchange Online to make sure you get the performance and behavior you expect after migration.

Migrate mailboxes from Exchange Server

For migrations from an existing on-premises Exchange Server environment, an administrator can migrate all email, calendar, and contacts from user mailboxes to Office 365.

An administrator performs a staged or cutover migration to Office 365. All email, contacts, and calendar information can be migrated for each mailbox.

There are three types of email migrations that can be made from an Exchange Server: Continue reading → Ways to Migrate Multiple Email Accounts to Office 365