Getting the F@£$ Out – Keeping Teams Polite

rudepolite.jpgTeams is a nice place to discuss the issues of the day, but what happens if someone abuses the platform and sends some abusive or otherwise objectionable messages?

The simple answer is that team owners should keep an eye on discussions and remove anything that shouldn’t be there. That’s OK if team owners are omnipresent and have the time and energy to check every channel in every team they own. Not every owner does so.

Continue reading → Getting the F@£$ Out – Keeping Teams Polite

Backup Office 365…It’s in the Cloud. It’s ALREADY backed up…..isn’t it?

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Over the last few years, I’ve seen a significant increase in the number of  businesses moving from on-premises Exchange environments to Office 365. That move makes absolute sense. When it comes to messaging, there’s hardly any difference (in terms of business value and competitiveness) whether you run it yourself or consume it a service.

But one area in particular does make a difference: backup and restore. Continue reading → Backup Office 365…It’s in the Cloud. It’s ALREADY backed up…..isn’t it?

Teams PowerShell Module Gets a Nice Little Refresh

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Given that the Teams and Skype for Business Online Admin Center recently introduced support for team management, it is unsurprising that Microsoft has refreshed the Teams PowerShell module. You can now download version 0.9.5 from the PowerShell Gallery).

In terms of the administrative control over Teams, the module has improved steadily from the first release and is now capable of handling most of the administrative operations available in the Teams and Skype for Business Online Admin Center. Cmdlets are available to create teams (including a team for an existing Office 365 group), list all teams in the tenant, update settings for teams, and create new channels. Because the module is still evolving, some change is inevitable before the final release. Even with this warning, you can depend on the current release for production use. Continue reading → Teams PowerShell Module Gets a Nice Little Refresh

Verifying Administrator Access to Office 365 User Data

Office-365-Customer-Lockbox-An-introduction_44465a_headerAdministrators have always been able to access user content and don’t need eDiscovery functionality to do this. Administrators can log onto someone’s mailbox or give themselves permission to access a user’s OneDrive account, or use the Search-Mailbox cmdlet to copy messages from user mailboxes to another mailbox. And they can run content searches to scan mailboxes, SharePoint, OneDrive, Teams, Office 365 Groups, and public folders and export whatever they find to PST files, ZIP files, or individual files. In short, many ways are available to an Office 365 administrator to poke around in user content if they so wish. Continue reading → Verifying Administrator Access to Office 365 User Data

Archiving Teams

Video_tape_archive_storage_(6498637005).jpgEarlier this month, Microsoft disclosed that Teams now boasts an official solution for archiving.

To archive a team, click Teams in the navigation bar in the desktop or browser client to expose the list of teams, then the Manage cogwheel icon under the list of teams. You see a list of teams that you belong to, divided into active teams and archived teams. You can only archive a team when you are an owner of that team. The choice to Archive team is in the ellipsis menu for the team. Continue reading → Archiving Teams

Hybrid Configuration Wizard Transfers Settings – Sorry bit late now

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Microsoft’s announcement that the Exchange Hybrid Configuration Wizard (HCW) is now able to transfer some configuration settings from an Exchange on-premises organization to Exchange Online came as a disappointment. Not because of the functionality, which is welcome, but because it is limited and far too late. Continue reading → Hybrid Configuration Wizard Transfers Settings – Sorry bit late now

Teams Can Now Capture Compliance Records for Hybrid & Guest Users

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Capturing Compliance Data Since January

Neatly aligned with the need for better compliance mandated by GDPR, Microsoft announced on June 1 that they have been collecting compliance records for messages sent by on-premises users in personal chats since January 31, 2018. Microsoft says that they are working to create compliance records for chats before this date but cannot commit to when this data might be available. Continue reading → Teams Can Now Capture Compliance Records for Hybrid & Guest Users

GDPR Data Subject Requests with Office 365

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With GDPR taking effect on May 25, any company operating in the European Union must be able to deal with Data Subject Access Requests (DSRs). Section 3 of Article 15 says that “The controller shall provide a copy of the personal data undergoing processing [to the data subject].”

In the context of Office 365, the controller is the administrator of an Office 365 tenant while the personal data is anything held in an Office 365 data store relating to the data subject (a person). An organization has up to 30 days to respond to a request, which might come from a current or former employee, or someone who does business with the organization. Here’s an interesting blog post describing the kind of request you might receive. Continue reading → GDPR Data Subject Requests with Office 365

Microsoft Switches Office 365 Groups to Private by Default

Microsoft’s original vision for Office 365 Groups emphasized openness. Anyone could create a group and all groups were public. The aim was to foster collaboration and make sure that anyone could join in any group discussion as they liked.

Time passes by and software matures in the fierce heat of customer opinion. The original dedication to openness is less than it was. A group creation policy allows tenants to restrict the creation of new groups to a limit set of users. Teams hides groups that it creates from Exchange clients to avoid the chance of confusing users and Yammer-originated groups are invisible anywhere outside Yammer.

And now, Microsoft has decided to change the default access type for a group from public to private to satisfy  the third-highest rated request for Groups on Uservoice, the place where customers voice their opinion about changes they’d like Microsoft to make.

Continue reading → Microsoft Switches Office 365 Groups to Private by Default

Data Resiliency in Microsoft Office 365

Given the complex nature of cloud computing, Microsoft is mindful that it’s not a case of if things will go wrong, but rather when. Microsoft designed their cloud services to maximize reliability and minimize the negative effects on customers when things do go wrong. We have moved beyond the traditional strategy of relying on complex physical infrastructure, and Microsoft have built redundancy directly into the cloud services. They use a combination of less complex physical infrastructure and more intelligent
software that builds data resiliency into our services and delivers high availability to the customers.
This post describes data resiliency in Microsoft Office 365 from two perspectives:
1. How Microsoft prevents customer data from becoming lost or corrupt in Exchange Online,
SharePoint Online, and Skype for Business; and
2. How Exchange Online, SharePoint Online, and Skype for Business protect customer data
against malware and ransomware. Continue reading → Data Resiliency in Microsoft Office 365