Advanced Office 365 Message Encryption Includes Branded Communications and Revocation

Message Encryption for the Office 365 Masses

Office 365 Message Encryption (OME) is the technology behind the ability of Exchange Online users to send encrypted messages sent to any recipient. Included in the Office 365 E3 and E5 plans (and equivalent education and government plans), OME is automatically enabled for tenants to allow people to use the Encrypt-Only feature supported by Outlook and OWA. Outlook mobile can read encrypted email inline but isn’t yet able to send encrypted messages. To support clients that don’t support encryption, OME also supports encryption through Exchange transport rules (aka mail flow rules). Continue reading

Data Resiliency in Microsoft Office 365

Given the complex nature of cloud computing, Microsoft is mindful that it’s not a case of if things will go wrong, but rather when. Microsoft designed their cloud services to maximize reliability and minimize the negative effects on customers when things do go wrong. We have moved beyond the traditional strategy of relying on complex physical infrastructure, and Microsoft have built redundancy directly into the cloud services. They use a combination of less complex physical infrastructure and more intelligent
software that builds data resiliency into our services and delivers high availability to the customers.
This post describes data resiliency in Microsoft Office 365 from two perspectives:
1. How Microsoft prevents customer data from becoming lost or corrupt in Exchange Online,
SharePoint Online, and Skype for Business; and
2. How Exchange Online, SharePoint Online, and Skype for Business protect customer data
against malware and ransomware. Continue reading

Deep Dive: How Hybrid Authentication Really Works

A hybrid deployment offers organizations the ability to extend the feature-rich experience and administrative control they have with their existing on-premises Microsoft Exchange organization to the cloud. A hybrid deployment provides the seamless look and feel of a single Exchange organization between an on-premises Exchange organization and Exchange Online in Microsoft Office 365. In addition, a hybrid deployment can serve as an intermediate step to moving completely to an Exchange Online organization.

But one of the challenges some customers are concerned about is that this type of deployment requires that some communication take place between Exchange Online and Exchange on-premises. This communication takes place over the Internet and so this traffic must pass through the on-premises company firewall to reach Exchange on-premises.

The aim of this post is to explain in more detail how this server to server communication works, and to help the reader understand what risks this poses, how these connections are secured and authenticated, and what network controls can be used to restrict or monitor this traffic. Continue reading

Demystifying Hybrid Free/Busy: what are the moving parts?

Hybrid Free/Busy is one of those things that many people do not fully understand. If everything works well, the complexity is hidden from view and people working in various parts of organization can seamlessly work together. But if things go wrong… you will appreciate deeper understanding of what makes it work. This is why we wanted to create the blog post series on the subject.

In this article, we will discuss how Free/Busy works in an Exchange Hybrid configuration. In next blog post, you will learn what are the most common problems along with how we go about diagnosing those (often) complex issues.

So, what is Free/Busy? Free/Busy is a feature that allows you to see when others are free (their calendar shows availability), busy (their calendar shows them as busy), or even Out of Office, or Something Else (tentative or working away) so that you can find an appropriate time for your meetings. Calling it all “Free/Busy/OOF/Something-Else” didn’t sound so cool to marketing hence “Free/Busy”. In a Hybrid deployment, we usually have some mailboxes in Exchange On-Premises and some mailboxes in Exchange Online (users are in different premises) and this has to work there too. Continue reading

iOS 11 and Exchange 2016/Online: Not Loving the Love

Screen Shot 2017-09-22 at 10.48.04

An Easy Upgrade to iOS 11

The excitement barely stopped as I upgraded my iPhone 7s Plus to iOS 11 soon after Apple released the upgrade on September 19. The good news is that the upgrade was fast and seamless, which I expected because the phone is recent and I do not use any old 32-bit apps. All my apps worked after the upgrade, including those that I use with Office 365 such as Outlook for iOS (including support for multi-factor authentication), Outlook Groups, Yammer, Teams, Office 365 Admin (Figure 1), and so on. Continue reading

Ways to Migrate Multiple Email Accounts to Office 365

Your organization can migrate email to Office 365 from other systems. Your administrators can migrate mailboxes from an Exchange Server or migrate email from another email system. And your users can import their own email, contacts, and other mailbox information to an Office 365 mailbox created for them. Your organization also can work with a partner to migrate email.

Before you start an email migration, review limits and best practices for Exchange Online to make sure you get the performance and behavior you expect after migration.

Migrate mailboxes from Exchange Server

For migrations from an existing on-premises Exchange Server environment, an administrator can migrate all email, calendar, and contacts from user mailboxes to Office 365.

An administrator performs a staged or cutover migration to Office 365. All email, contacts, and calendar information can be migrated for each mailbox.

There are three types of email migrations that can be made from an Exchange Server: Continue reading

Overview of importing PST files and SharePoint data to Office 365

 

You can use the Office 365 Import service to bulk-import PST files to Exchange Online mailboxes in your Office 365 organization. You can also use the Import service to bulk-import documents and other data from your on-premises organization to SharePoint Online and OneDrive for Business sites.

How to import data to Office 365

There are two ways that admins can import PST files and SharePoint data to Office 365.

Cloud uploadNetwork upload Upload the data files over the network to a temporary storage location in the Microsoft cloud. Then you use the Office 365 Import service to import the data to mailboxes or sites in your Office 365 organization.
Hard diskDrive shipping Copy the data files to a BitLocker-encrypted hard drive and then physically ship the drive to Microsoft. When Microsoft receives the hard drive, data center personnel upload the data to a temporary storage location in the Microsoft cloud. Then you use the Office 365 Import service to import the data to mailboxes or sites in your Office 365 organization. Drive shipping is a good way to import data to OneDrive for Business sites.

See one of the following topics for the step-by-step instructions for importing PST files or SharePoint data to Office 365.
Continue reading