Verifying Administrator Access to Office 365 User Data

Office-365-Customer-Lockbox-An-introduction_44465a_headerAdministrators have always been able to access user content and don’t need eDiscovery functionality to do this. Administrators can log onto someone’s mailbox or give themselves permission to access a user’s OneDrive account, or use the Search-Mailbox cmdlet to copy messages from user mailboxes to another mailbox. And they can run content searches to scan mailboxes, SharePoint, OneDrive, Teams, Office 365 Groups, and public folders and export whatever they find to PST files, ZIP files, or individual files. In short, many ways are available to an Office 365 administrator to poke around in user content if they so wish. Continue reading → Verifying Administrator Access to Office 365 User Data

GDPR Data Subject Requests with Office 365

GDPRGDPR Data Subject Access Requests

With GDPR taking effect on May 25, any company operating in the European Union must be able to deal with Data Subject Access Requests (DSRs). Section 3 of Article 15 says that “The controller shall provide a copy of the personal data undergoing processing [to the data subject].”

In the context of Office 365, the controller is the administrator of an Office 365 tenant while the personal data is anything held in an Office 365 data store relating to the data subject (a person). An organization has up to 30 days to respond to a request, which might come from a current or former employee, or someone who does business with the organization. Here’s an interesting blog post describing the kind of request you might receive. Continue reading → GDPR Data Subject Requests with Office 365

What Does GDPR Mean For You & Office 365

By now you will have heard about the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that will be coming into effect shortly. This was started by the European Commission in 2012 and finally generally agreed upon by the European Parliament and Council in December 2016. This new plan is to replace the current Data Protection Directive 95/46/ec.

Most companies have already adopted privacy processes and procedures consistent with the Directive, the GDPR contains a number of new protections for EU data subjects and threatens significant fines and penalties for non-compliant data controllers and processors once it comes into force in the spring of 2018. There are some core areas that are of great importance when trying to understand this new policy, as well as seeing how it fits into existing policies and also platforms that you may be using. Continue reading → What Does GDPR Mean For You & Office 365